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OnFinals

Two Months On

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So to understand the tax side of things I have a question:

we activated our green cards in October 2014 and will move to USA from SA in October 2015. My business (cc owned) will continue to run in SA -are you saying I will pay tax on both incomes in both countries?

Thank you

Hahaha!

 

Ignore my previous post, Malamute has answered you in far more detail than I.

And I'd rather not confuse you or any others wandering on to this thread.

 

 

Good luck!

Edited by JumpingJasonFlash

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Much appreciated Malamute, you are so informed and generous with this info!

 

So, if I sell any of my properties in SA anytime from now I pay CGT here, do I end up like Boris Johnson having to pay USA as well or is that because he is still a citizen?

 

When I become a citizen in 5 years time and I sell any of the properties in SA do I then owe CGT to whom?

 

thanks

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It will depend on circumstances - e.g. where you were living, how long you lived in the property, how long ago etc. If you are living in the US as a Green Card holder and subsequently sell a property outside the US, the US treats it as if that property was in the USA - i.e. was it your primary residence etc.

 

As with other income, you do have to declare it on your IRS return. If you paid CGT in SA - which is likely unless it is your primary residence- you MAY be able to claim this CGT as a deduction, or exclude this up to the threshold permitted by the Foreign Income Exclusion. However, the USA law on what constitutes a primary residence differs slightly from the SA definition, so it depends on so much - primary or secondary residence etc.

 

On that note, it will be hard to claim a SA property as a primary residence, when you are supposed to be resident in the USA with your Green Card.

 

In the case of Boris Johnson, yes, it is because he is a US citizen and subject to US tax on worldwide income. The same is true of a Green Card holder. From the day you land and validate that card - you are a resident, and subject to tax on your worldwide income - even if you don't live in the USA.

 

Again, this gets messy and complex and expert advice advised! That said, it is unexpectedly hard to track down tax advisors who really know this stuff. Your average online (H&R Block, Turbo Tax etc) don't accommodate it very well.

Edited by Malamute

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The financing on a pre owned car is higher than what you will get on a new car.

 

Water damaged cars are sometimes sold, Cars are moved around the USA so you could potentially buy a car that has been in a flood. Check the carpeting for mold / dampness. If possible lift the carpeting to see if the floor is rusted.

 

Cars that are a few years older may be close to requiring an new Transmission which on average could cost you over $3200,00

 

American built cars appear to have more engine trouble compared to cars from Japan

 

Faulty airbags- There are hundreds of thousands of cars with faulty airbag recalls that need to be replaced.

 

I prefer to drive cars that are under warranty as most new cars have expensive electronic components and braking systems and when they do get faulty or need replacement they could cost you a chunk of change.

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The National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) could also be of great help

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Thanks everyone! I managed to get a car so we are really relieved

Need some advice: We now have temporary number plates which need to be replaced in 30 days. The dealer thinks we need a state drivers license in order to buy new plates. Is this correct? IF it is, does it mean I need to do the drivers test in 30 days?

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Thanks everyone! I managed to get a car so we are really relieved

Need some advice: We now have temporary number plates which need to be replaced in 30 days. The dealer thinks we need a state drivers license in order to buy new plates. Is this correct? IF it is, does it mean I need to do the drivers test in 30 days?

What state? We didn't need a local license to get new plates (CA). However you also need to check your state's rules about how long you have to get a state driver license once you have become a resident. This can vary from 10 days to (I believe) 6 months.

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SJ27 is right that every state is different, so best to check the rules see how they apply to your State.

 

Honestly though, if you haven't got your state issued drivers license yet, you should try as soon as possible. There's really no point or benefit in waiting longer than necessary, especially if you have no immediate plans to move to a different State.

 

Besides, it REALLY does make life sooooooo much easier for nearly everything! From buying alcohol and certain medicines, to checking in at airports for your domestic flights, opening all kinds of accounts and applying for insurance etc. Then there are the occasional ID checks by assistants when swiping your credit card at the store. Yes, your Green Card and Passport will get the job done in most cases, but every now and again it doesn't work out so great as they are hardly common forms of ID used for daily life. Registering for a USPS P.O. Box or certain types of USPS delivery, for example, requires two separate forms of ID in two seperate 'categories'. Turns out that a Green Card and Passport fall into the same category in that case, so that's when a state issued driver's license does the trick.

 

We just bit the bullet and did our test the same week we arrived. The written test is multiple choice and hardly rocket science and takes like 5-10 mins on a computer. You can honestly read through the entire booklet 20 mins before and pass the test. Given the fact that you aren't exactly 16-years old and clearly know how to drive a car, the physical portion of test should be a mere formality too.

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Yes, a drivers license is universally accepted as credible proof of name and (especially) address.

 

Be careful when you do the "written" test on the computer. A passing score is 80%, but the test might only have 25 questions - thus, each wrong answer counts for 4%. "They" also try to confuse you, so, read carefully and rather select "pass" if you are not completely sure about an answer and return to them later.

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Also differs by state. In CA we had 40 questions, if you get more than 6 wrong you fail (85% to pass). The test was mostly pretty straightforward to someone who's been driving a while, with a few specific questions that need new learning (a couple of 'distance allowed' things, what the different colored kerbs mean, etc).

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Agree with janneman.

I do not know if all states do the same sort of test , but there was a lot of questions about how much fines are for certain offences and distance questions in Texas. That was the hardest questions as you can guess the correct answers for distance questions , But it can be tricky since south Africans are used to meters and these are in feet.

Edited by figjam

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