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South Africa's lost its appeal

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Hey Maarten,

 

Very true words spoken there.

 

Over these past few years you have matured even more and been exposed to many different situations and experiences.

 

The great thing is that no one can take any of these experiences away from you - good or bad. As years go by you will cherish many of these memories and the fact that your family is with you in a safe / safer environment is thanks to you making the right decisions at the right time.

 

To bad about the financial position not being as good as it was but so what !! its only money after all. We met people in the rural parts of Mozambique in 1994 who were dirt poor - the funny thing is that they did not even know that they were poor - but they were really happy and cheerful - and accepted the hardships as though that's what life is all about.

 

Sterk wees seun alles sal reg kom. Don't worry -- be happy :ilikeit: :ilikeit: :ilikeit: :ilikeit:

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Hey Maarten,

 

Very true words spoken there.

 

Over these past few years you have matured even more and been exposed to many different situations and experiences.

 

The great thing is that no one can take any of these experiences away from you - good or bad.  As years go by you will cherish many of these memories and the fact that your family is with you in a safe / safer environment is thanks to you making the right decisions at the right time.

 

To bad about the financial position not being as good as it was but so what !! its only money after all.  We met people in the rural parts of Mozambique in 1994 who were dirt poor - the funny thing is that they did not even know that they were poor  - but they were really happy and cheerful - and accepted the hardships as though that's what life is all about.

 

Sterk wees seun alles sal reg kom.  Don't worry  -- be happy  :ilikeit:  :ilikeit:  :ilikeit:  :ilikeit:

Ag Thanks Boet!

 

I agree with all you said. Travelling and immigrating does provide one with exceptional experiences - as for the money part of it - Ja, I don't know I'm poor until I sober up either :blink:

hahahaha

I gues it is just a different way of life. In sa, you ddn't have to worry about as many bills as over here and sometimes, it can become a little bit of a pain in tha arse. I just shelled out for bellsouth - friggin $70 - and no long distance or DSL!!!! grrrrrrrr

anyways, true - family is happy, safe and fat. All that matters.

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I too have been home numerous times, and can agree with some things and disagree with others. I find that comparing everything when you get there will get you KNOWHERE, and just end up spoiling your trip by frustrating the heck out of you! I take each trip for what it is (a chance to see family and friends, and the country of my birth). I cannot look down on the people that I left behind because they are the ones who are building..not sitting on the sidelines passing comments like the supervisors in the CCC:-) I tip my hat to them...I settled here, and that was my choice.

Things are expensive when I go home...for me, and for them...but at the same time I go to fill a prescription for something simple like birth control pills and get charged at the rate of nearly $1.10 per pill...CRAZY! A pill pack in SA id FREE!

I think that we as expats have to stop bellaching about how expensive things are over there...you are only there for a short time...and are choosing to be there. Constantly griping about that does not help anyone or anything. I go to the braais and stuff here, and just have to shake my head. No-one is saying that you have to wax lyrical about SA all the time, but just be respectful of the country from which you came (whatever it's past may be), and enjoy it for what it is when you go there. If Americans can see the good that we have there (anyone see the article in the September Vanity Fair??-On Cape Town), then what is wrong with us that we can't? Are we just pessimistic by nature?!

Anyhow, that is my two cents...or maybe even a penny!

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I have not been there in 18 years. But my wife was there in June, and according to her...things were really cheap.

 

What do I know..

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That is a good industry to be in, in the lowveld. Lots of tourism - especially to the Park. B&B is a good investment in that area.

 

Thanks, will DL and view the pics at home...our Techie is on a withc-hunt.

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I think that we as expats have to stop bellaching about how expensive things are over there...you are only there for a short time...and are choosing to be there. Constantly griping about that does not help anyone or anything. I

there is nothing wrong with comparing certain things when you are on a holidy with the place you live in. If I go to Europe I look at the price of shoes to see if it makes sense for me to get some there rather than at barney's New York. If I am in the UK I know that eating out in a really fine restaurant is not worth it because they are expensive compared to the US especially as the pound is almost double the dollar.

 

In the Caribbean it makes sense to look at jewellry prices as there are some extremely good deals to be found and it makes sense to compare them to the local US prices, in New Zealand you can get a wonderful facial for about $35 at a nice salon, in the US that would cost about $90, so it is safe to say that salon services are cheap in NZ, and so on... If I go to a country , e.g. somewhere in South America where the currency is devalued I expect to get some good deals on certain things.

 

If I go to SA at a time when the currency is 10:1 I expect to get some good deals and don't expect to end up paying $75 for a short summer dress that would cost maybe $40 here. When I do, then I can make an informed decision about what I feel is expensive, based on what things cost in my hometown. I found some things in SA expensive COMPARED WITH what I would pay for them in America. Thsi is not belly aching or disrespectful...this is economics in my opinion. The more you travel the more you will compare certain things in different places, there is nothing wrong with making an informed decision about where and how to spend your money, or which countries or cities have better service in hotels, less pollution etc.

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No argument there skattie.

 

As MArtin knows...my wife goes overseas 1 or 2 times a year. Mostly Europe.

Two months ago she went to SA and said it was cheap. What can I say??

 

 

Anytime Spokie...anytime

Edited by Sheik

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hehehe Sheik - your wife is living the life of luxury, eh? I'm glad she enjoyed the trip!

I'm heading to SA in February of 2005 for a month. Can't wait - it feels like ages. I'm an outdoorsy guy and I love being in the veld - would love to see the prairies though.

Anyways, yes, I love the nature/wildlife in South Africa's north east, but I just can't have my family live there.

Can't wait to party with my friends and see my family. My one uncle won't be around for too long, so it will probably be goodbye when I leave - poor man.

I'm not going to compare prices at all - it will drive me nuts.

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Guest Guest_Bokkechick

I am all for making informed decisions when you are abroad, but that was clearly not what I was referring to. I was referring to the constant griping by expats when they go back...if something is too expensive, DON'T BUY IT! I (like most people) live on a budget, but when I go home I take the trip for the purpose that it was intended. I cannot stand when expats go around at home with their noses in the air, and come back here and whine about how expensive things got...the people at home complain less! Deal with it...the world is changing...South Africa has been changing at a rapid pace...Foreigners (non-SA's) seem to be ALOT less critical than expats...what's up with THAT?! You chose to leave, so be happy with your decision and don't go over there expecting things to be 1984!

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I am all for making informed decisions when you are abroad, but that was clearly not what I was referring to. I was referring to the constant griping by expats when they go back...if something is too expensive, DON'T BUY IT! I (like most people) live on a budget, but when I go home I take the trip for the purpose that it was intended. I cannot stand when expats go around at home with their noses in the air, and come back here and whine about how expensive things got...the people at home complain less! Deal with it...the world is changing...South Africa has been changing at a rapid pace...Foreigners (non-SA's) seem to be ALOT less critical than expats...what's up with THAT?! You chose to leave, so be happy with your decision and don't go over there expecting things to be 1984!

I think to some extent in this type of thread people generalise. Not everyone goes back to SA for the same reason - some people go back on vacation and see it as they would see any other country that they are visiting on vacation and once you have travelled a bit, you soon see that there are many countries that can and do compete with and outdo SA on many levels. (for example, SAs have always had this notion that SA is the "most beautiful" country in the world, very subjective opinion and not really true)

 

I am not sure if some of these comments are directed at this thread or if the anger and aggression is in response to specific experiences that some posters have had with specific people in their social circle. I found at the beginning of this thread that posters were very balanced in describing which things were cheaper (relative to the US) and which were expensive.

 

 

It seems to me also that people who see the US as "home" as apposed to SAs living in the US and referring to SA as "going home" will also feel more emotional and protective about SA than people who are happy to call the US home and see SA for what it is : the place of their birth and and integral part of their formative years but something that is less relevant to their present life than the country they are living in now, and therefore would have less need to defend it in threads such as these. I guess this comes with time and each person's individual goals and ability to move on.

 

I think there is also nothing wrong with going back to SA after a few years and realising that it is not the place you have been longing for, is not as great as you remembered it, you don't like the way things have changed, now that you have lived in the US for a few years you are in a position to actually compare certain things for yourself and so now when you get back to the US you can honestly say to yourself and others that "SA has lost its appeal" and not feel the need anymore to ever go back or continue to miss it. In my opinion this is when you are truly free to be happy without the baggage that all immigrants carry.

Edited by skattie

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Did I ever say I expected it to be the same?

And, no noses in the air here at all.

I am about as rational as they come...sorry

 

Dont understand the sudden tirade

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Funny..personally I never get involved in political arguments...I NEVER trash SA..

 

Must be me...

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My turning point came with the Olympic Games...

 

I watched the SA men's team win a swimming relay. I was proud. Of course. But I didn't feel that fuzzy pride that I used to when I first arrived here and SA achieved something. I find myself routing for the American athletes in Athens and get the goosebumps when the play the US national anthem. Not really so with Nkosi Sikelele...

 

This is home now. I can't really identify with all the changes in SA that I know that have taken place since I moved here. I will always have fond memories of the country... but I feel I'm truly growing where I'm planted... right here in Texas! :D

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